erikkwakkel:

A glove to find your way in 19th-century London
This amazing artifact came by in my Twitter feed today and it is too special not to share. It is a glove that was purchased in 1851 as a tourist souvenir at London’s Great Exhibition, which was attended by a variety of famous individuals, from Charles Darwin to Charlotte Brontë. The leather glove is special because it contains a map that shows the routes to Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, which was the main staging area for the exhibition. It appears to be made for a child, perhaps in case he lost his parents in the crowds. The glove is one of a variety of maps that was produced for the many visitors to the city. Another is this wonderful folding specimen printed on silk, which shows a great amount of detail (check out the enlargements). London in the palm of your hand: a functional memento from the time that the tourist industry was beginning to boom.
Pic: Kew, The National Archives, EXT 11/159 (c. 1851). This the source of the image; here and here is more information on the glove (the latter webpage, from the archive that keeps the artifact, suggests it was a kid’s glove). The glove features on various blogs, such as this one; I saw it in this tweet today.

erikkwakkel:

A glove to find your way in 19th-century London

This amazing artifact came by in my Twitter feed today and it is too special not to share. It is a glove that was purchased in 1851 as a tourist souvenir at London’s Great Exhibition, which was attended by a variety of famous individuals, from Charles Darwin to Charlotte Brontë. The leather glove is special because it contains a map that shows the routes to Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, which was the main staging area for the exhibition. It appears to be made for a child, perhaps in case he lost his parents in the crowds. The glove is one of a variety of maps that was produced for the many visitors to the city. Another is this wonderful folding specimen printed on silk, which shows a great amount of detail (check out the enlargements). London in the palm of your hand: a functional memento from the time that the tourist industry was beginning to boom.

Pic: Kew, The National Archives, EXT 11/159 (c. 1851). This the source of the image; here and here is more information on the glove (the latter webpage, from the archive that keeps the artifact, suggests it was a kid’s glove). The glove features on various blogs, such as this one; I saw it in this tweet today.

(via mirousworlds)



Got my second to last school book today! Since the other two can be bought on my nook, I only needed this one and another I’m buying used! Also bought the final two volumes of Nausicaa! Can’t wait to read them ALL! #nausicaaofthevalleyofthewind #nausicaa #howwesurvivedcommunismandevenlaughed #slavenkadrakulic #unc #history

Got my second to last school book today! Since the other two can be bought on my nook, I only needed this one and another I’m buying used! Also bought the final two volumes of Nausicaa! Can’t wait to read them ALL! #nausicaaofthevalleyofthewind #nausicaa #howwesurvivedcommunismandevenlaughed #slavenkadrakulic #unc #history



Druids temple, England

Druids temple, England

(via thedeerandtheoak)


nordic-drifter:

It is well known that Viking explorers used the sun and stars to navigate across open seas, but what did they do when the sun and stars weren’t visible? For centuries legends have told of various tools that Vikings used to help navigate, among them the fabled Sunstone. Now, researchers believe they have finally found one of these stones. 
Until recently, nothing was found among Viking artifacts that matched descriptions from the sagas. However, researchers now believe the mythical sunstone was a calcite-like crystal known as Iceland spar. After extensive tests, researchers now believe that this crystal can be used as an incredibly accurate navigational aid.
Fragments of Iceland spar were first found, or first recognized, in Icelandic Viking settlements only last year.

nordic-drifter:

It is well known that Viking explorers used the sun and stars to navigate across open seas, but what did they do when the sun and stars weren’t visible? For centuries legends have told of various tools that Vikings used to help navigate, among them the fabled Sunstone. Now, researchers believe they have finally found one of these stones. 

Until recently, nothing was found among Viking artifacts that matched descriptions from the sagas. However, researchers now believe the mythical sunstone was a calcite-like crystal known as Iceland spar. After extensive tests, researchers now believe that this crystal can be used as an incredibly accurate navigational aid.

Fragments of Iceland spar were first found, or first recognized, in Icelandic Viking settlements only last year.

(via thoughtlessfroth)


inebriatedpony:

talesfromtheend:

narrativepriorities:

justamus:


A rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.
Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.



Hearts in my eeeeeeyyyyyyyyyyyyyes


Holy shit. Brb inventing time travel

Baaaaaaabe!

inebriatedpony:

talesfromtheend:

narrativepriorities:

justamus:

A rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.

Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.

Hearts in my eeeeeeyyyyyyyyyyyyyes

Holy shit. Brb inventing time travel

Baaaaaaabe!

(via joachimmurat)



archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

(via ritterlied)


While in Chapel Hill, I saw this book and had to have it! Japanese interment during WWII has fascinated and saddened me since finding out about it through my own study as a kid. This is a book filled with photographs taken by Bill Manbo, a prisoner in the camp, with a Kodachrome camera. This gives an exceptionally rare glimpse of life in the camp, in color! I think the Bon Odori festival is my favorite thus far!

While in Chapel Hill, I saw this book and had to have it! Japanese interment during WWII has fascinated and saddened me since finding out about it through my own study as a kid. This is a book filled with photographs taken by Bill Manbo, a prisoner in the camp, with a Kodachrome camera. This gives an exceptionally rare glimpse of life in the camp, in color! I think the Bon Odori festival is my favorite thus far!


coolchicksfromhistory:

November is Native American Heritage Month

All photos by Edward S. Curtis via the Library of Congress, original captions:

Top: O Che Che, Mohave Indian womanQahatika girlSelawik Woman

Middle: Chaiwa—TewaKlamath womanCayuse woman

Bottom: Wisham femaleTsawatenok girlYaqui girl